Home - Photo Jottings

Welcome to Photo Jottings! Feel free to browse the site; there’s a lot of stuff here, so starting with the site guide may be a good idea.  Film lovers can start with my film camera reviews and scanned negatives here and here.  For all my Minolta and Sony lens reviews, go here.

Film buying pages; one for color, and one for B&W.  This covers all film (110, 35mm, 120 roll, and sheet), currently available fresh dated by the manufacturer.

Kodak Ektachrome E100 in stock here.

Olympus LT Zoom 105 Review

Our review camera for today is the compact and elegant Olympus LT Zoom 105, featuring a rich 'Leather Tech' outer cover which actually appears to be an automotive grade naugahyde, but it still looks pretty neat, that's why I bought it---unfortunately I think I got ripped off, see the test shots below.

Olympus offered at least two models of the 'LT' series, the Zoom 105 with a 38-105mm lens, and an LT-1 prime with 35/3.5 and a faux leather flap lens cover.  I see four colors available, burgundy, brown, black and a greenish one.  Later versions include...

Read more »

Hendren Weekender Review

Hendren Weekender Review

This week we review an interesting device, not often seen, or immediately identified as a camera; an AM/FM Clock Radio flashlight Camera, called 'The Weekender.'  There isn't much information available online other than a paragraph about it coming out in 1983, and being mail order only with a retail price of around $75.  I think the original post of the information is here.

The official name on the back of the camera is: Hendren Enterprise AM/FM LCD Clock Radio Camera-Model-The Weekender.  For a closer look and more info, see the images below.

'The Weekender' is also called the 'Octopus,' apparently because the device has eight functions: AM/FM Radio, 110 Camera, Clock, Flashlight, Storage compartment in back, Stop watch, Wake up alarm, and Dual time zone indicator.

Surprisingly, my 'Weekender' is fully functional, and I was able to take some snaps while enjoying music and hiking along a mountain trail.  Thanks to the alarm clock...

Read more »

Spring Lawn Care…in 1918.

Here's another picture from a set taken at Ware Brothers Sporting Goods and Hardware Store in Spokane Washington; this time featuring various lawn care products for you to consider.  It looks like this image was taken outside the store at night on one of their sidewalk window displays.  I think 125 Howard St might be the address at the time of these photographs.  The picture dates from approximately 1918.

Let's peek inside and see what we have for sale; there are two reel mowers; a 'Reliable' and 'Hero' brand, both 'self adjusting' and featuring 'Ball Bearings' in the reel mechanism I'm assuming.  Darn, I can't read the hanging tags to check out the price.  It looks like both are made by the same company as the...

Read more »

Kodak Bantam Special Review

The Kodak Bantam Special has been reviewed by just about every site connected with photography it seems, digital and analog, so I thought I'd join the crowd and try and add to the conversation, hopefully in a meaningful way.

What jumped out at me the most when I first encountered the Kodak Bantam Special was not just the shiny black Piano finish, the art deco styling, the clever modified clamshell design, or the resemblance to a black pinstriped suit, but at how small it was.  It's actually smaller than a modern mirrorless camera (see pic below) with a pancake lens, and it'll fit in a shirt or pants pocket for great convenience, however, it is a bit weighty, so maybe a small waist pack would be a better carrying device during your photo outings.

Our review Camera was manufactured in the late 1930s, and used 828 roll film with backing paper for a total of just eight shots.  The capture area for this film is 28mm x 40mm; a little larger...

Read more »

Kodak FunSaver Review

The Kodak FunSaver, B&H, Amazon, eBay, is a 'single use,' 'throw-away' or 'disposable' camera, whichever term you prefer.  Like nearly all single use cameras, it has a very simple plastic lens, manual film advance, and 27 exposures. This model comes with a flash, and apparently replaced the Kodak HD Power Flash model a few years ago, so I'm updating Kodak's primary single use camera...

Read more »

Camera Review Updates

I've added some accessory updates to the Agfa Record III, and Pilot Super reviews.  I forgot to include the 37mm slip-on type hood and filters for the Record Solinar lens, and the carrying case when I first posted it.  And for the Pilot Super, by a stroke of luck, I came across an original reduction mask for 6x4.5cm pictures.  Of course, all that stuff is pictured in the product shots inside the reviews, along with eBay links.

Stay tuned for more camera reviews.  Believe it or not, the Kodak and Fuji single use cameras are always in the top 10, and quite often the top 5 of the most visited pages at Photojottings.  Unfortunately, the Kodak Powerflash HD is not longer available, so I'm reviewing the newest version called the 'Funsaver' to get things up to date.  Also in the hopper are the Olympus LT Zoom, Kodak Medalist II, Kodak Bantam Special, Ricoh YF-20 Super, and a few others, but not necessarily in that order...

Read more »

A second look at slide vs color negative film.

I thought I'd post another set of samples showing the differences between Color negative, and Color reversal film, otherwise known as 'slide' film.  The first post was here, where I compared two images taken at the same time with the same scene, but with totally different cameras.  For our second look, the same camera was used for both images as I was able to swap-out the Fuji Velvia film with Kodak Portra 800 back at the hotel room, and head back for the second Church shot.

The Little Stone Church is the subject for our comparison today.  For the first shot I used Fuji Velvia 100 color reversal (slide) film, and at the bottom, Kodak Portra 800, both taken with the Agfa Record III reviewed here.

Since I used two different types of film, and even different apertures, let's not compare the sharpness and grain detail of the pictures, that's not what we're looking for.  As a side note; the Agfa Solinar lens is really sharp at F/22, noticeably more so than at F/16, and those were the apertures I used below.

The images below were cropped to a 6x4.5cm aspect ratio (removed excess sky and street) from a 6x9cm area, and...

Read more »

Argus C-3 ‘The Brick’ Review

One day last fall a client asked me if I liked cameras, to which I replied yes, (glad I wasn't a smart aleck that day by saying no...) and she handed over this excellent working Argus C3 with a few accessories.  Actually, I hit the mother load; the very kind Lady ended up giving me a dozen cameras originally purchased new by her late husband, mostly in good to excellent condition, and all working and complete!  So now I have enough material to keep new reviews coming for the next several months and beyond!!

The Argus C3 and variants have been around for a long time, at least since the late 1930s, and literally millions were made.  Thankfully, it seems...

Read more »

Scroll to Top