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Ricoh Mirai 105 Zoom Review

The 1980s brought us some goofy cameras, and the Ricoh Mirai (the future) 105 Zoom is one of them; it's boxy and almost camcorder like in it's appearance since the flash and AF sensors are on the side of the lens instead of along the top as it would be on a traditionally designed 35mm type camera, so it's actually a regular camera, but it looks odd as it has a big upturned grip for your right hand.  The Ricoh Mirai 105 is not the only unusual looking camera from the crazy 80s, (remember the Samurai?), did you know Olympus...

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Expo Watch Camera Review

This week we check out a unique device for taking stealthy images; the Expo Watch Camera.  An October 1917 ad in a Popular Mechanics Magazine suggests you'll get lots of fun taking pictures of your friends in an act of a 'funny stunt.'  You'll also have even more fun when you see the look of bewilderment on their faces when you show them the pictures you took.  I bet the 'funny stunts' back then were a little different than the 'funny stunts' that get pulled today.

The camera actually works properly, so be sure and check out my test samples at the bottom of the review and see what the Expo is capable of today...

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Konica Pearl III Review

This diminutive, but stylish Japanese coupled rangefinder camera is a Konica Pearl III, and it's from the late 1950s, a time when medium format folding cameras were on their way out, (as were folding cameras in general), and small format 35mm cameras were all the rage.

Our late model Pearl III has a nice feature set including a four element 75mm F/3.5 'Tessar' type lens, a nine speed shutter with the dreaded light value scale embedded on the shutter speed ring, and an 'automatic film advance' mechanism which BTW, doesn't wind your film automatically, you wind it yourself just like a regular folder, but it's supposed to be safer, and more precise than watching for the shot number in the red window of your average folder.  Other nice features include a coupled rangefinder, cable release, accessory shoe, and the ability to use 30.5mm screw-in filters.  Oddly, this high spec camera has no...

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Kodak Moment #14 1958 Plymouth Savoy

My Dad bought this '58 Savoy around 1962-3 as a pile of rust, and spent a few months after work fixing the dents, and rotting fenders and doors, then finally painting it and getting it back on the road as a daily driver for my Mom.  Years later Mom would load my brother and me in the car to run errands and get groceries, and by that time, the car was starting to fall apart again.

My only memories I have of riding in it was that every time Mom drove through a puddle, I'd get soaked.  I always...

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Ricoh YF-20 Super Review

The Ricoh YF-20 Super is, at least outwardly, an uninspiring fixed focus compact 35mm camera, with a three element lens, flash, and motorized drive.  However, upon close inspection, it has a really nice feature that makes this model stand out; there's a sliding switch under the lens that allows you to focus the camera to longer distances.  The switch is spring loaded, so you have to keep it pressed while taking the picture, that way when you go back to taking snaps of family and friends, your focus is back to where is should be for sharp shots.  The real beauty of the infinity focus feature is that you can use wider apertures and still get crisp images, so...

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Olympus LT Zoom 105 Review

Our review camera for today is the compact and elegant Olympus LT Zoom 105, featuring a rich 'Leather Tech' outer cover which actually appears to be an automotive grade naugahyde, but it still looks pretty neat, that's why I bought it---unfortunately I think I got ripped off, see the test shots below.

Olympus offered at least two models of the 'LT' series, the Zoom 105 with a 38-105mm lens, and an LT-1 prime with 35/3.5 and a faux leather flap lens cover.  I see four colors available, burgundy, brown, black and a greenish one.  Later versions include...

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Hendren Weekender Review

Hendren Weekender Review

This week we review an interesting device, not often seen, or immediately identified as a camera; an AM/FM Clock Radio flashlight Camera, called 'The Weekender.'  There isn't much information available online other than a paragraph about it coming out in 1983, and being mail order only with a retail price of around $75.  I think the original post of the information is here.

The official name on the back of the camera is: Hendren Enterprise AM/FM LCD Clock Radio Camera-Model-The Weekender.  For a closer look and more info, see the images below.

'The Weekender' is also called the 'Octopus,' apparently because the device has eight functions: AM/FM Radio, 110 Camera, Clock, Flashlight, Storage compartment in back, Stop watch, Wake up alarm, and Dual time zone indicator.

Surprisingly, my 'Weekender' is fully functional, and I was able to take some snaps while enjoying music and hiking along a mountain trail.  Thanks to the alarm clock...

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Spring Lawn Care…in 1918.

Here's another picture from a set taken at Ware Brothers Sporting Goods and Hardware Store in Spokane Washington; this time featuring various lawn care products for you to consider.  It looks like this image was taken outside the store at night on one of their sidewalk window displays.  I think 125 Howard St might be the address at the time of these photographs.  The picture dates from approximately 1918.

Let's peek inside and see what we have for sale; there are two reel mowers; a 'Reliable' and 'Hero' brand, both 'self adjusting' and featuring 'Ball Bearings' in the reel mechanism I'm assuming.  Darn, I can't read the hanging tags to check out the price.  It looks like both are made by the same company as the...

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