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Kodak FunSaver Review

The Kodak FunSaver, B&H, Amazon, eBay, is a 'single use,' 'throw-away' or 'disposable' camera, whichever term you prefer.  Like nearly all single use cameras, it has a very simple plastic lens, manual film advance, and 27 exposures. This model comes with a flash, and apparently replaced the Kodak HD Power Flash model a few years ago, so I'm updating Kodak's primary single use camera...

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Camera Review Updates

I've added some accessory updates to the Agfa Record III, and Pilot Super reviews.  I forgot to include the 37mm slip-on type hood and filters for the Record Solinar lens, and the carrying case when I first posted it.  And for the Pilot Super, by a stroke of luck, I came across an original reduction mask for 6x4.5cm pictures.  Of course, all that stuff is pictured in the product shots inside the reviews, along with eBay links.

Stay tuned for more camera reviews.  Believe it or not, the Kodak and Fuji single use cameras are always in the top 10, and quite often the top 5 of the most visited pages at Photojottings.  Unfortunately, the Kodak Powerflash HD is not longer available, so I'm reviewing the newest version called the 'Funsaver' to get things up to date.  Also in the hopper are the Olympus LT Zoom, Kodak Medalist II, Kodak Bantam Special, Ricoh YF-20 Super, and a few others, but not necessarily in that order...

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A second look at slide vs color negative film.

I thought I'd post another set of samples showing the differences between Color negative, and Color reversal film, otherwise known as 'slide' film.  The first post was here, where I compared two images taken at the same time with the same scene, but with totally different cameras.  For our second look, the same camera was used for both images as I was able to swap-out the Fuji Velvia film with Kodak Portra 800 back at the hotel room, and head back for the second Church shot.

The Little Stone Church is the subject for our comparison today.  For the first shot I used Fuji Velvia 100 color reversal (slide) film, and at the bottom, Kodak Portra 800, both taken with the Agfa Record III reviewed here.

Since I used two different types of film, and even different apertures, let's not compare the sharpness and grain detail of the pictures, that's not what we're looking for.  As a side note; the Agfa Solinar lens is really sharp at F/22, noticeably more so than at F/16, and those were the apertures I used below.

The images below were cropped to a 6x4.5cm aspect ratio (removed excess sky and street) from a 6x9cm area, and...

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Argus C-3 ‘The Brick’ Review

One day last fall a client asked me if I liked cameras, to which I replied yes, (glad I wasn't a smart aleck that day by saying no...) and she handed over this excellent working Argus C3 with a few accessories.  Actually, I hit the mother load; the very kind Lady ended up giving me a dozen cameras originally purchased new by her late husband, mostly in good to excellent condition, and all working and complete!  So now I have enough material to keep new reviews coming for the next several months and beyond!!

The Argus C3 and variants have been around for a long time, at least since the late 1930s, and literally millions were made.  Thankfully, it seems...

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Budweiser, The King Of Beers, But Not Cameras.

Here comes the King....and the Clydesdales; remember the jingle? Play it while you read the review for fun.

This week we review a Budweiser beer can themed camera produced in the late 1990s, but I think they've been around since the late 1970s.  This 35mm reusable camera really does resemble a beer can, and you'll get some funny looks when you carry this around with you during your morning walk!!  Or better yet; add to the realism by carrying it around like you've just cracked open a cold one, and then get in your car and drive away!

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Century Petite No.1 4×5 Camera Review

The Petite No.1 was Century's low cost option for people looking at 4x5 cameras.  This particular specimen was made around 1906 (give or take a year), and came equipped with everything one would need for taking basic pictures; a ground glass back for precise focusing, or snap shot style using the focusing scale on the bed and the viewfinder.  Also included was a good Century (Bausch and Lomb) 6½" Rapid Rectilinear lens with instant, bulb or time modes, and a simple rise and fall adjustment.  As a beginners model, and as the name suggests, the 4x5 Petite was very small and lightweight, in fact, Century used the terms 'snap shot' and 'hand camera' in their catalogs of the day. 

How about taking a break from work for a moment and step inside the Photojottings time machine, during the 'good ole days,' and before lithium batteries and electronic contraptions made our lives more cluttered and boring...

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Kodak No. 1a Review

Our review camera for this week is the Kodak No. 1A Series III with Carl Zeiss Jena Tessar F/6.3 lens.  I purchased this 'high end' folding Kodak a few years ago, and have used it on several occasions.  Recently I ran a couple rolls of 120 film using some adapters for 6x11 images, but more on that farther down in the review.  Apart from the nice lens, the 1A has a focusing scale in both feet and meters, and uses a thumbscrew to move the lens and shutter assembly back and forth to get the correct focus.  Another neat feature is what Kodak calls rise and slide; it's used for correcting keystoning when you point the camera up, as in a picture of a tall building; however, the correction doesn't show up in the viewfinder, so you have to guess what's happening, and hope you have the subject in the frame; so maybe it's not so 'neat' or 'useful.'  I've used this feature on a larger camera, (Kodak 3A), and it works quite well, but only if you check it with a ground glass back, which is not an option on the 1A.

Our fully working review camera was manufactured around 1932, at the very end of the 'Autographic' film era...

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Virginia Slims

You've come a long way, baby; now you can get cancer and die, just like us men folk!

This week we review a Virginia Slims promotional camera from 1995.  When you purchased a carton of cigarettes, you received a free disposable camera!  And even better, you could get a free Beach Chair after you finished smoking 60 packs, (1200 cigarettes minimum), and then sent in the UPC labels!!

I purchased this camera as a collector's item from ebay, but guess what, I'm going to use it!  Being pre-loaded with color film from 1995, I wasn't so sure I'd get any useable images after development, but as luck would have it, I did get a few grainy keepers, which I've posted below.  Surprisingly, the color shifts are...

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