Film Cameras Archives - Page 2 of 9 - Photo Jottings

Film Cameras

Hendren Weekender Review

Hendren Weekender Review

This week we review an interesting device, not often seen, or immediately identified as a camera; an AM/FM Clock Radio flashlight Camera, called 'The Weekender.'  There isn't much information available online other than a paragraph about it coming out in 1983, and being mail order only with a retail price of around $75.  I think the original post of the information is here.

The official name on the back of the camera is: Hendren Enterprise AM/FM LCD Clock Radio Camera-Model-The Weekender.  For a closer look and more info, see the images below.

'The Weekender' is also called the 'Octopus,' apparently because the device has eight functions: AM/FM Radio, 110 Camera, Clock, Flashlight, Storage compartment in back, Stop watch, Wake up alarm, and Dual time zone indicator.

Surprisingly, my 'Weekender' is fully functional, and I was able to take some snaps while enjoying music and hiking along a mountain trail.  Thanks to the alarm clock...

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Kodak Bantam Special Review

The Kodak Bantam Special has been reviewed by just about every site connected with photography it seems, digital and analog, so I thought I'd join the crowd and try and add to the conversation, hopefully in a meaningful way.

What jumped out at me the most when I first encountered the Kodak Bantam Special was not just the shiny black Piano finish, the art deco styling, the clever modified clamshell design, or the resemblance to a black pinstriped suit, but at how small it was.  It's actually smaller than a modern mirrorless camera (see pic below) with a pancake lens, and it'll fit in a shirt or pants pocket for great convenience, however, it is a bit weighty, so maybe a small waist pack would be a better carrying device during your photo outings.

Our review Camera was manufactured in the late 1930s, and used 828 roll film with backing paper for a total of just eight shots.  The capture area for this film is 28mm x 40mm; a little larger...

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Kodak FunSaver Review

The Kodak FunSaver, B&H, Amazon, eBay, is a 'single use,' 'throw-away' or 'disposable' camera, whichever term you prefer.  Like nearly all single use cameras, it has a very simple plastic lens, manual film advance, and 27 exposures. This model comes with a flash, and apparently replaced the Kodak HD Power Flash model a few years ago, so I'm updating Kodak's primary single use camera...

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Argus C-3 ‘The Brick’ Review

One day last fall a client asked me if I liked cameras, to which I replied yes, (glad I wasn't a smart aleck that day by saying no...) and she handed over this excellent working Argus C3 with a few accessories.  Actually, I hit the mother load; the very kind Lady ended up giving me a dozen cameras originally purchased new by her late husband, mostly in good to excellent condition, and all working and complete!  So now I have enough material to keep new reviews coming for the next several months and beyond!!

The Argus C3 and variants have been around for a long time, at least since the late 1930s, and literally millions were made.  Thankfully, it seems...

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Budweiser, The King Of Beers, But Not Cameras.

Here comes the King....and the Clydesdales; remember the jingle? Play it while you read the review for fun.

This week we review a Budweiser beer can themed camera produced in the late 1990s, but I think they've been around since the late 1970s.  This 35mm reusable camera really does resemble a beer can, and you'll get some funny looks when you carry this around with you during your morning walk!!  Or better yet; add to the realism by carrying it around like you've just cracked open a cold one, and then get in your car and drive away!

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Century Petite No.1 4×5 Camera Review

The Petite No.1 was Century's low cost option for people looking at 4x5 cameras.  This particular specimen was made around 1906 (give or take a year), and came equipped with everything one would need for taking basic pictures; a ground glass back for precise focusing, or snap shot style using the focusing scale on the bed and the viewfinder.  Also included was a good Century (Bausch and Lomb) 6½" Rapid Rectilinear lens with instant, bulb or time modes, and a simple rise and fall adjustment.  As a beginners model, and as the name suggests, the 4x5 Petite was very small and lightweight, in fact, Century used the terms 'snap shot' and 'hand camera' in their catalogs of the day. 

How about taking a break from work for a moment and step inside the Photojottings time machine, during the 'good ole days,' and before lithium batteries and electronic contraptions made our lives more cluttered and boring...

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Kodak No. 1a Review

Our review camera for this week is the Kodak No. 1A Series III with Carl Zeiss Jena Tessar F/6.3 lens.  I purchased this 'high end' folding Kodak a few years ago, and have used it on several occasions.  Recently I ran a couple rolls of 120 film using some adapters for 6x11 images, but more on that farther down in the review.  Apart from the nice lens, the 1A has a focusing scale in both feet and meters, and uses a thumbscrew to move the lens and shutter assembly back and forth to get the correct focus.  Another neat feature is what Kodak calls rise and slide; it's used for correcting keystoning when you point the camera up, as in a picture of a tall building; however, the correction doesn't show up in the viewfinder, so you have to guess what's happening, and hope you have the subject in the frame; so maybe it's not so 'neat' or 'useful.'  I've used this feature on a larger camera, (Kodak 3A), and it works quite well, but only if you check it with a ground glass back, which is not an option on the 1A.

Our fully working review camera was manufactured around 1932, at the very end of the 'Autographic' film era...

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Virginia Slims

You've come a long way, baby; now you can get cancer and die, just like us men folk!

This week we review a Virginia Slims promotional camera from 1995.  When you purchased a carton of cigarettes, you received a free disposable camera!  And even better, you could get a free Beach Chair after you finished smoking 60 packs, (1200 cigarettes minimum), and then sent in the UPC labels!!

I purchased this camera as a collector's item from ebay, but guess what, I'm going to use it!  Being pre-loaded with color film from 1995, I wasn't so sure I'd get any useable images after development, but as luck would have it, I did get a few grainy keepers, which I've posted below.  Surprisingly, the color shifts are...

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