Film Cameras Archives - Page 2 of 10 - Photo Jottings

Film Cameras

Expo Watch Camera Review

This week we check out a unique device for taking stealthy images; the Expo Watch Camera.  An October 1917 ad in a Popular Mechanics Magazine suggests you'll get lots of fun taking pictures of your friends in an act of a 'funny stunt.'  You'll also have even more fun when you see the look of bewilderment on their faces when you show them the pictures you took.  I bet the 'funny stunts' back then were a little different than the 'funny stunts' that get pulled today.

The camera actually works properly, so be sure and check out my test samples at the bottom of the review and see what the Expo is capable of today...

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Konica Pearl III Review

This diminutive, but stylish Japanese coupled rangefinder camera is a Konica Pearl III, and it's from the late 1950s, a time when medium format folding cameras were on their way out, (as were folding cameras in general), and small format 35mm cameras were all the rage.

Our late model Pearl III has a nice feature set including a four element 75mm F/3.5 'Tessar' type lens, a nine speed shutter with the dreaded light value scale embedded on the shutter speed ring, and an 'automatic film advance' mechanism which BTW, doesn't wind your film automatically, you wind it yourself just like a regular folder, but it's supposed to be safer, and more precise than watching for the shot number in the red window of your average folder.  Other nice features include a coupled rangefinder, cable release, accessory shoe, and the ability to use 30.5mm screw-in filters.  Oddly, this high spec camera has no...

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Ricoh YF-20 Super Review

The Ricoh YF-20 Super is, at least outwardly, an uninspiring fixed focus compact 35mm camera, with a three element lens, flash, and motorized drive.  However, upon close inspection, it has a really nice feature that makes this model stand out; there's a sliding switch under the lens that allows you to focus the camera to longer distances.  The switch is spring loaded, so you have to keep it pressed while taking the picture, that way when you go back to taking snaps of family and friends, your focus is back to where is should be for sharp shots.  The real beauty of the infinity focus feature is that you can use wider apertures and still get crisp images, so...

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Olympus LT Zoom 105 Review

Our review camera for today is the compact and elegant Olympus LT Zoom 105, featuring a rich 'Leather Tech' outer cover which actually appears to be an automotive grade naugahyde, but it still looks pretty neat, that's why I bought it---unfortunately I think I got ripped off, see the test shots below.

Olympus offered at least two models of the 'LT' series, the Zoom 105 with a 38-105mm lens, and an LT-1 prime with 35/3.5 and a faux leather flap lens cover.  I see four colors available, burgundy, brown, black and a greenish one.  Later versions include...

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Hendren Weekender Review

Hendren Weekender Review

This week we review an interesting device, not often seen, or immediately identified as a camera; an AM/FM Clock Radio flashlight Camera, called 'The Weekender.'  There isn't much information available online other than a paragraph about it coming out in 1983, and being mail order only with a retail price of around $75.  I think the original post of the information is here.

The official name on the back of the camera is: Hendren Enterprise AM/FM LCD Clock Radio Camera-Model-The Weekender.  For a closer look and more info, see the images below.

'The Weekender' is also called the 'Octopus,' apparently because the device has eight functions: AM/FM Radio, 110 Camera, Clock, Flashlight, Storage compartment in back, Stop watch, Wake up alarm, and Dual time zone indicator.

Surprisingly, my 'Weekender' is fully functional, and I was able to take some snaps while enjoying music and hiking along a mountain trail.  Thanks to the alarm clock...

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Kodak Bantam Special Review

The Kodak Bantam Special has been reviewed by just about every site connected with photography it seems, digital and analog, so I thought I'd join the crowd and try and add to the conversation, hopefully in a meaningful way.

What jumped out at me the most when I first encountered the Kodak Bantam Special was not just the shiny black Piano finish, the art deco styling, the clever modified clamshell design, or the resemblance to a black pinstriped suit, but at how small it was.  It's actually smaller than a modern mirrorless camera (see pic below) with a pancake lens, and it'll fit in a shirt or pants pocket for great convenience, however, it is a bit weighty, so maybe a small waist pack would be a better carrying device during your photo outings.

Our review Camera was manufactured in the late 1930s, and used 828 roll film with backing paper for a total of just eight shots.  The capture area for this film is 28mm x 40mm; a little larger...

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Kodak FunSaver Review

The Kodak FunSaver, B&H, Amazon, eBay, is a 'single use,' 'throw-away' or 'disposable' camera, whichever term you prefer.  Like nearly all single use cameras, it has a very simple plastic lens, manual film advance, and 27 exposures. This model comes with a flash, and apparently replaced the Kodak HD Power Flash model a few years ago, so I'm updating Kodak's primary single use camera...

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Argus C-3 ‘The Brick’ Review

One day last fall a client asked me if I liked cameras, to which I replied yes, (glad I wasn't a smart aleck that day by saying no...) and she handed over this excellent working Argus C3 with a few accessories.  Actually, I hit the mother load; the very kind Lady ended up giving me a dozen cameras originally purchased new by her late husband, mostly in good to excellent condition, and all working and complete!  So now I have enough material to keep new reviews coming for the next several months and beyond!!

The Argus C3 and variants have been around for a long time, at least since the late 1930s, and literally millions were made.  Thankfully, it seems...

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