Film Negative Archives - Photo Jottings

Film Negative

Kodak Ektachrome E100 samples

I received my roll of Kodak Ektachrome E100 back from the developers last week, and I've put together a few samples for you to check out.  Funny, but it appears the Darkroom (in San Clemente, CA), are using the Fuji Velvia profile for scanning the Kodak film, because the Ektachrome scans look almost identical to Fuji Velvia I've had developed from them in the past, see sample below.  I order scans from them just in case the film gets lost in the mail on the way back.  As a side note; I've had good luck with the Darkroom for developing my E-6 film, but they don't seem to be able to correctly scan images for shadow details, they're almost totally black, so I always do it myself at home using the...

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Crocker Highlands in Oakland CA, 1918

Welcome to a very early look at the upscale Crocker Highlands development, just east of Oakland, California.  High Society folks living here now describe the development as 'a neighborhood that overflows with an abundance of character and charm, and exhibits a genteel ambiance of an old Hollywood movie set.'  Crocker Highlands offers elegant examples of Tudor, Spanish, Arts and Crafts, Beaux Arts, and Art Deco period homes.

Zeroing in on the actual location is a bit tricky.  I see...

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The Tavern in Mansfield MA, c1910

Here's a sample image from a roll of 122 film, taken in front of 'The Tavern' in Mansfield Massachusetts sometime around 1910 according to literature that came with the negative.  'The Tavern' was a Hotel and Restaurant built by Walter Lowney, who years earlier built a chocolate factory down the street, so in this scene the photographer may have been smelling baking brownies while taking the picture!  There isn't much online information of 'The Tavern' in Mansfield, MA, so it's probably not there anymore; and likely followed a lot of other wood framed buildings from the era and burned to the ground 'suddenly during the night.'

This picture is a good example of the kind of quality you could get with a simple folding pocket camera over a century ago...

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A few samples from the Fuji GA645Zi zoom

Here are a few samples from the Fuji GA645Zi zoom.  This medium format camera is the third and final model in the Fuji GA645 series, and the only one with a zoom feature, but only at four focal lengths, 55mm, 65mm, 75mm and 90mm, there are no in between settings.  So far the quality of both the lens and camera seem very good.  I'm in the process of testing it out right now, and have only...

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A quick comparison between 135 and 6×9 film

Here's a quick comparison of the resolution between two excellent fixed lens cameras, the Olympus 35 SP, and the Fuji GW690III.  Both cameras have the same aspect ration, and about the same coverage and depth of field, that's why this comp will have some value if you want to know the quality you'll need for large print sizes.  Of course there are other differences between the two films sizes other than just resolution potential, but this is just a quick write up until I dedicate a post to the subject.

The Olympus 35 SP has a 42mm lens, and uses 135 cartridge film, known by hobbists as "35mm" film, which isn't actually 35mm for the imaging area, but that's for another post.  Image area is about 24x36mm

The Fuji GW690III has a 90mm lens and uses 120 roll film, with a size known as 6x9, but it isn't actually 6x9cm, that's also for another post.  Image area is about 56x83mm

Both lenses are widely known to be extremely sharp, and have very similar coverage areas; the Fuji would be about 40-41mm converted to 135 format, so it's at a slight disadvantage for this comparison.

To sum up the two images quickly; I'm actually surprised...

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CineStill 50D samples

As a follow up to this film, I thought I'd try out a roll of Kodak Vision3 film, sold byCineStill as CineStill 50D when the rem-jet layer is removed.  This removal process adds odd characteristics to the film, like forming red halos and tinged borders around dark to bright transitions; check out the shots below to see what I'm talking about.

CineStill 50D Xpro is actually Kodak Vision3 50D 5203 color negative film, which has a coating called 'remjet' for use in motion picture cameras; however, Cinestill has removed the coating so it can be developed in standard color print C-41 chemicals.  Kodak Technical info here.

Kodak touts its Vision3 50D as the worlds finest grain film.  Characteristics...

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