Film Cameras Archives - Page 2 of 4 - Photo Jottings

Film Cameras

Kodak No. 1 Green Pocket Camera review

Check out the little No.1 Pocket Kodak, this model is triple green; metal trim, bellows, and outer cover.  Not only is the camera green, so is the box and carrying case!  If you don't fancy this John Deere green hue, you could also choose brown, blue or gray.   This camera was marketed towards people that wanted a bit more than the mundane black on black camera that millions of others already had, but didn't want to spend a lot of money, and had little experience in taking pictures.

Our colorful review camera for today was manufactured around 1930, give or take a year, during the waning period of the 'Autographic' Kodak film era that ended about 1934.  It's a small camera, but not really lightweight, and certainly not something that you would but in your shirt pocket.  Kodak made 'pocket' cameras that were quite a bit smaller than this one, and others that were huge, and would not fit in any clothing pocket that I've ever seen!

The old No. 1 Kodak takes 120 film, which is still widely available today.  Other features include adjustable aperture and shutter speeds, thumb screw focusing and 'time' and 'bulb' mode.

Due to the bad bellows on this camera, I only was able to take a couple of shots by bagging it, (see picture below); so I'm short on actual test shots. I could replace the bellows, but it would destroy the look of the camera, and lower the value too.  BTW, if you see one of these colored cameras with a black bellows, it means it has been replaced.

Would you like to see what's possible with a camera manufactured during the era of prohibition?  Read on!

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Nikon 35Ti review

The diminutive Nikon 35Ti was one of the very best pocket cameras that came out in the 1990s, and continues to be impressive even in the age of digital; with their massive megapixels that use complex and very expensive lens designs to work well with a sensor instead of film.  Ironically, the now 25+ year old Nikon 35Ti has one of the sharpest lenses I've ever come across; it just seems much sharper with more contrast along the sides than the newer lenses designed for digital cameras; which oddly are much larger and heavier, see the image with the Sony A7R and Sony FE Zeiss 35mm F/2.8 lens inside.

I've had this camera since about 2014 and use it quite often when traveling; it's small and never gets in the way, plus I know all the pics will come out good, and I won't need to waste time checking out my pictures when I get back to the hotel room at night like we all do with digital, right?

For those of you that want a pocket point and shoot camera capable of taking razor sharp pictures, and getting properly exposed slide film; this is your dream come true!!

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Canon ELPH Jr review, featuring the Advanced Photo System.

The Canon ELPH Jr IX240 is the most convenient pocket camera I've ever used, film or digital.  Size wise, it's similar to a pack of cigarettes, and fits in your shirt pocket just fine, see picture inside. The ELPH Jr is a film camera, and uses APS film which has not been manufactured since around 2010-11.  However, there is a bright spot for those that want to experiment with this state of the art film system.  Currently, Amazon and eBay have some 'cold stored' film available here Amazon, eBay, and that's mostly what I've used for this review.  So grab yourself a beer, and let's head back to the nineties!

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FujiFilm QuickSnap Review

The FujiFilm QuickSnap Flash, B&H, Amazon, eBay, is a 'single use,' 'throw-away' or 'disposable' camera, whichever term you prefer.  Like nearly all single use cameras, it has a very simple plastic lens, manual film advance, and 27 exposures. This model comes with a flash.

These little cameras are about as easy to use as it gets for film. The film is already loaded, all you do is advance the film via thumb wheel until it won't turn anymore, then simple look through the viewfinder and take a snap. If you want a little fill flash, just push the button up on the front of the camera until the pop-up plastic piece turns red, which means the flash is ready, see pic below.

You'll see a bunch of these at weddings where the guests are encouraged to pick them up and start shooting, especially after the liquor starts to flow, then turn them in to the hosts before going home so the newlywed couple can get them developed and have some laughs later on...

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Ansco Color Clipper Camera Outfit Review

Our next camera up for review is the Ansco Color Clipper; complete with flash unit!  This was an eBay impulse buy, and I think it was about $50. I'm a sucker for weird cameras, especially when they're in good usable condition as this one is.

In the early 1950s when the camera was made, the "Color Clipper' name was probably chosen to try and fool people into thinking it was made specifically for color film, which was pretty new and cool back then; however, any camera will produce nice looking color pictures,  even century old folders.

The Ansco Color Clipper is well build, uses readily available 120 film, and has zone focusing and double exposure prevention, not bad for an inexpensive 'outfit' back in the day.

Some of these old cameras are capable of producing pretty good prints using cheap meniscus type lenses, and my hope was that this one would be good enough for medium sized prints.  To find out if it met my expectations, go to the bottom of the review; but first off, let's take a look at the camera specs...

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Fuji GS645S Wide 60 Review

The Fuji GS645S is a great way to get started in medium format film.  The camera is light weight, relatively small, easy to operate, and the simple exposure meter works fairly well even with slide film; and the best part: you don't need any batteries to get full use from the camera!  I really like it, the images have much more resolution than 35mm, which allows you to crop and fit the picture in a different aspect ratio frame, like an 8x10 or 5x7 etc.  User warning; don't ding the cow bar, otherwise you'll be sorry!  Find out what that means inside...

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ILFORD HP5 single use camera review

Our review camera today is the ILFORD HP5 Plus 400 single use camera  (B&H Photo, Ebay, Amazon) which comes loaded with ILFORD HP5 400 black and white film.  Apparently this is ILFORDs attempt to enter the ever-dwindling single use camera market currently dominated by Kodak and Fuji; if so, Kodak and Fuji have nothing to worry about.  These simple little film cameras are supposed to appeal to customers that want something different, and fun.  Some folks may have fun with a really cheap quality B&W camera, and some folks will be angry that they wasted ten bucks.  Based on the results I received, I'm among the latter.

Shall we do a quick walk-around of our review camera?

Film type; black and white HP5 Plus 400.  This is somewhat of a 'classic' B&W film with

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Fuji GW690III 90mm F/3.5 Camera Review

Check out my latest camera review for film lovers, this one took me two years to complete(!) It's the companion to the wide angle GSW690III.  Also available in the review are super high res samples!!

If you're looking for a little more resolution than what you're getting from your 35mm film cameras look no further!  The Fuji 'G' 6x9 series cameras are great, with enough resolution for really big prints, or future proofing on the coming 8k screens if you like to scan your pictures and look at them on your computer.

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